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Thursday, January 19

Sunday, December 19

  1. page Great Literacy Resource Sites for Teachers edited ... Katherine Hargett: Spanish Content Literacy Tools. http://cfbstaff.cfbisd.edu/cfbcurriculum/…
    ...
    Katherine Hargett: Spanish Content Literacy Tools.
    http://cfbstaff.cfbisd.edu/cfbcurriculum/Content%20Literacy%20OL/CLS%20Templates/content_literacy_strategies%20Default.htm
    Katherine Hargett: Spanish News Sites. http://als.lib.wi.us/SpanishResources.htm
    Math
    Laura Soscia- http://www.opsu.edu/www/education/Reading%20Strategies%20Applied%20to%20Math%20Presentation.pdf
    (view changes)
    7:02 pm
  2. page Great Literacy Resource Sites for Teachers edited ... Hopkins:http://www.readingquest.org/strat/ Hopkins: http://www.manatee.k12.fl.us/staff_develo…
    ...
    Hopkins:http://www.readingquest.org/strat/
    Hopkins: http://www.manatee.k12.fl.us/staff_development/CRISS/prin_phil/7%20Defensible%20Strategies.doc%20(Read-Only).pdf
    Katherine Hargett: Reading Strategies for the Secondary Classroom. http://central.laramie1.org/modules/cms/pages.phtml?pageid=23783
    English
    Pam Principe pre- http://teacher.scholastic.com/scholasticnews/magazines/scope/pdfs/SCOPE-TE-021808.pdf
    ...
    Sara Orleck - http://sppo.osu.edu/tlc/reading.cfm
    Sara Orleck - http://www.heinle.com/spanish_d/templates/resources/0838407021_spanishlife/instructor/strategy.html
    Katherine Hargett- Teaching Proficiency through Reading and Storytelling. http://www.tprstories.com/about.htm
    Katherine Hargett. Literacy Rich Environments. http://www.k8accesscenter.org/training_resources/literacy-richenvironments.asp
    Katherine Hargett: Incorporating World Language Instruction and Technological Literacy. http://technospan.wikispaces.com/Teacher+Sites
    Katherine Hargett:Content Strategies for Foreign Language Literacy. http://suse-step.stanford.edu/resources/LanguageSite/Foreign_Language_Strategies.html
    Katherine Hargett: Spanish Content Literacy Tools.
    http://cfbstaff.cfbisd.edu/cfbcurriculum/Content%20Literacy%20OL/CLS%20Templates/content_literacy_strategies%20Default.htm

    Math
    Laura Soscia- http://www.opsu.edu/www/education/Reading%20Strategies%20Applied%20to%20Math%20Presentation.pdf
    (view changes)
    6:54 pm
  3. page Post Reading0 Opinionaire- khargett edited 14. OpinionnaireGive Opinionnaire- Post Reading Strategy Description: After reading, give st…
    14. OpinionnaireGive
    Opinionnaire- Post Reading Strategy
    Description: After reading, give
    students 10ten strongly worded
    ...
    explain their reasoning. Allowreasoning.Allow time to
    ...
    questions further. Opinionnairesforce students to take a stand for or against the statements. They must also support their stance with examples and reasoning. Opinionnaires are a greatway to gather the opinions of students on texts or ideas learned about in the classroom. This post-reading strategy can be used in social studies todetermine how much of the class likes or dislikes the ideas of presidential candidates, or in language arts to determine the way students feel about certaincharacters or characters’ actions. Scales can be and are mostly used with the Opinionnaire reading strategy, such as the Likert scale. If the Likert scale is used, students are to determine
    they agree, strongly agree, disagree, or strongly disagree with a certain topic or event. It is important with this strategy that students pick an answer and
    cannot remain 'on the fence' about their answer.
    An Opinionnaire shouldn’t have too many questions, as students will get overwhelmed with the number instead of actually thinking the questions through.
    Students may be asked to back up their opinion, so if they strongly agree with something (if the Likert scale is used), they must explain why that is.
    They might also be asked to support that opinion using quotes or information taken directly from the text. These are ways in which teachers can better
    assess if students rushed through or took the time to answer with details and background information and careful consideration. Opinionnaires can also
    be used to assess whether or not the level of comprehension desired has been reached or not.
    Why Use Opinionnaires: The purpose of the Opinionnaires are to get students to understand and better comprehend texts, along with get them to share their opinions and support those opinions with evidence from the text. This is a great activity to pair with persuasive writing because students must choose a side and support it with facts from the text. Steps to Using an Opinionnaire: 1. Choose a controversial text or a variety of texts that showcase two sides to an argument or debate.2. Have students read all of the relevant texts that equally showcase both sides.3. After reading provide them with a 10 question Opinionnaire where they must choose from the follow for each statement: 1- Strongly agree2- Agree3- Disagree4- Strongly disagree 4. Next to each statement, provide a space where students state why they chose the response they chose. Include a requirement for textual support. 5. After completion, go through each statements and have students share their responses and their reasoning. Make sure to go over how to be respectful of each other's differences of opinion and how to debate in a polite and inoffensive manner.6. You could use this activity to lead into an actual mock debate within your classroom. How I Would Use Opinionnaires:
    I would collect a variety of news articles and editorials about the Dream Act and the status of illegal immigrants who were born in the United States. I would be sure to provide equal amounts of articles that represented both sides and some that are to be considered as bi-partisan as possible. I would then provide a ten question Opinionnaire about the current debate going on about the citizenship status of illegal immigrants who were born within the United States.
    After reviewing student's answers, I would hold a class debate. I would use this controversial issue as a model that everyone has a difference of opinion but there is a tactful and polite way to debate your differences in opinion. I would culminate this activity by having students write a persuasive editorial piece supporting their argument and using textual evidence from the articles as support.
    Works Cited:
    Opinionnaire. http://wikis.lib.ncsu.edu/index.php/Opinionnaire%C2%AE
    Reading Strategies for the Secondary Classroom. http://central.laramie1.org/modules/cms/pages.phtml?pageid=23783

    (view changes)
    6:35 pm
  4. page Post Reading- Popcorn Review- khargett edited Popcorn Review- Post Reading Strategy ... keep students engage and engageand paying attention…
    Popcorn Review- Post Reading Strategy
    ...
    keep students engage andengageand paying attention,
    ...
    Using Popcorn Review: 1.Review:1. Choose an
    ...
    Popcorn Review:
    I would use this technique after students read an informative text on one of our country studies. Students will learn about a different region of Spain each
    week and will read about each regions population, culture, history, government etc. I will divide students into groups and assign each group a region. They will have five minutes to review the informational packets on their region. Each group will take turns being the Popcorn Reviewers. I will turn it into a game where each group gets a point for each correct statement or fact they state. If the students in the crowd catch and correct an inaccurate statement, they will receive 2 points for their groups. This will be a great way to culminate their knowledge of the different regions while making it fun and engaging and keeping students interests throughout the whole lesson.
    (view changes)
    6:08 pm
  5. page Post Reading- Popcorn Review- khargett edited 17. Popcorn ReviewAfter Popcorn Review- Post Reading Strategy Description: After reading, 4-5 .…
    17. Popcorn ReviewAfterPopcorn Review- Post Reading Strategy
    Description: After
    reading, 4-5
    ...
    stands and elaborates onelaborateson or responds
    ...
    the reading. They must listen and correctthe Popcorn reviewers if they give innaccurate information. This is great for non-fiction text and to use as a review as well. Why Use Popcorn Review: This is a great after-reading strategy to use in an active classroom environment. This strategy allows students to have an interactive review of facts,procedures, and concepts and share their ideas, interpretations and reflections. Through this activity students are held responsible for what they’ve learnedand are given an opportunity to learn from each other. It is a student lead discussion that reviews the facts recently learned, with students not participatingin leading the discussion checking for inaccuracies and interjecting with other relevant information. This is also a great strategy to keep students engage and paying attention, because they must listen for inaccuracies. Steps to Using Popcorn Review: 1. Choose an informational text that could be used for Popcorn Review.2. After reading, have groups of 4-5 students stand in front of the room.3. They must take turns stating a fact from their reading. 4. Students who are not in the front must pay attention for any inaccuracies and correct them.5. The popcorn reviewers add information by building off of one another.6. Have different groups come up and give them a different sub-topic from the reading to report out on. How I Would Use Popcorn Review:
    I would use this technique after students read an informative text on one of our country studies. Students will learn about a different region of Spain each
    week and will read about each regions population, culture, history, government etc. I will divide students into groups and assign each group a region. They will have five minutes to review the informational packets on their region. Each group will take turns being the Popcorn Reviewers. I will turn it into a game where each group gets a point for each correct statement or fact they state. If the students in the crowd catch and correct an inaccurate statement, they will receive 2 points for their groups. This will be a great way to culminate their knowledge of the different regions while making it fun and engaging and keeping students interests throughout the whole lesson.
    Works Cited:
    Classroom Talk to Support Reading. https://filebox.vt.edu/users/val514/Math_4644/PopcornReview.html
    Reading Strategies for the Secondary Classroom. http://central.laramie1.org/modules/cms/pages.phtml?pageid=23783

    (view changes)
    6:05 pm
  6. page Post Reading- Cartooning- khargett edited Create Cartooning- Post Reading Strategy Description: After reading, have students create a C…
    CreateCartooning- Post Reading Strategy
    Description:
    After reading, have students create
    a Comic Strip
    I often use
    comic strips for students to retell a story. There are many waysstrip or cartoon using six boxes. The simplest way to do this. First I have students foldthis is take a piece of computer paper in half like a hotdog and then fold it two more times like a letter. This creates six boxes. I always have students write at least one to two students per box. Then theyinto sixths. The comic strip can draw pictures with the characters having think bubbles or talking bubbles.
    || Describe
    describe what happenshappened in the beginningbeginning, middle and end of the story. || Describe what happens inAnother option would be to have it describe the beginning ofproblem, solution and reflection on the story. || Describe what happens instory/critique (2 boxes each).
    Why Use Cartooning?
    Cartooning is a great way to meet
    the middleneeds of the story. ||
    Describe
    some of your diverse learners. It allows students to display what happens inthey learned and understood from the middlereading through a creative outlet. Those who are not so artistically inclined could cut pictures from magazines to create their comic strip. Therefore, everyone has an opportunity to be successful and creative.
    Steps to Using Cartooning:
    1. After reading, hold a group discussion to discuss the major elements
    of the story.
    Describe what happens in

    2. Explain to students that they are going to create a cartoon that summarizes
    the endstory they just read.
    3. They can draw or cut pictures out to create their cartoons.
    4. Have students fold a piece
    of the story.
    Describe what happens
    computer paper in sixths.
    5. Provide them a structure for
    the endcartoon such as:
    2 slides: Beginning
    of the story.story
    2 slides: Middle of story
    2 slides: End of story

    or
    || Title and author and comic strip creator (student name) || Characters ||1: Character
    2:
    Setting ||
    Problem
    Solution
    Reflection

    3: Conflict
    4: Climax
    5: Resolution
    5: Opinion
    6. Only allow a maximum of two speech bubbles per slide, so students do not rely too much
    on writing. You want them to express what they learned through a different outlet.
    7. Allow students
    the storyopportunity to present their comic strips with partners, groups or with the whole class.
    How I Would Use Cartooning:
    I would
    have students critique and givedevelop a comic strip sequel to a short story we read in Spanish entitled, "Mi Cita" (My date) about two friends from school who are each with their opinion.
    friend talking about a blind date they have in the afternoon. In the end, the blind date ends up being with each other. This will model their comprehension of the story as well as require students to make logical predictions about what they think will happen next.
    Works Cited:
    http://central.laramie1.org/modules/cms/pages.phtml?pageid=23783
    http://www.slideshare.net/bensucot/after-reading-strategies

    (view changes)
    5:34 pm
  7. page During Reading- Literature Circles- khargett edited ... Collaborative-learning based, the team members rely on each other and everyone must do their p…
    ...
    Collaborative-learning based, the team members rely on each other and everyone must do their part.
    Steps to Using a Literature Circle:
    1. Make sure you have a firm understanding of the Literature Circle process.
    2. Preview and read the books that students will choose among for this lesson so that you are familiar with the plot and literary elements. it is best to choose books that arouse emotions, are well-written, and are meaningful . The books should reflect students' reading levels as well. Gather copies of the books for each student group.
    3. Make copies of the Literature Circle Role Sheets for students to use independently and as they practice. Overhead transparencies of the forms may also be useful as the class explores the requirements of each task.
    4. Determine the literature groups ahead of class.
    5. Explain the process to the students, the different roles and provide an example for each role.
    6. Have the students split up into groups and assign the reading.
    7. Provide a role sheet to each student, depending on their role.
    8. Students will work independently at first to complete their role sheets.
    9. Once everyone is done, they will discuss what they have read and each student will take turn leading the conversation, based on their role. The Discussion Director will begin.
    10. You can have groups share with the whole class if you so choose.
    Here is a link for a variety of Literature Circle roles and accompanying role sheets: http://www.abcteach.com/directory/basics/reading/literature_circles/
    How I Would Use a Literature Circle:
    I would have students split up into groups of four and each group will have a different Mexican folktale children's book that they will be reading in Spanish. They will each be assigned one of the following role:
    -Discussion Director: Manages group and conversations; Comes up with questions based on conversation
    - Vocabulary Enricher: Finds Spanish vocabulary words that they think are important to know. Defines them and explains why they choose the words.
    - Cultural Encounter: Finds examples of Mexican culture and connects it to another text, culture, self or the world.
    - Summarizer: Summarizes what happened in the book.
    Students will share their roles with their group and then each group will put together a quick presentation that provides a synopsis of their folktale for the rest of the class, who read a variety of different folktales that they will also share.
    Works Cited:
    http://www.litcircles.org/Overview/overview.html
    http://www.readwritethink.org/classroom-resources/lesson-plans/literature-circles-getting-started-19.html?tab=1#tabs

    (view changes)
    5:06 pm
  8. page During Reading- Literature Circles- khargett edited Literature Circles- During Reading Strategy Description: In literature circles, small groups of …
    Literature Circles- During Reading Strategy
    Description:
    In literature circles, small groups of students gather together to discuss a piece of literature in depth. The discussion is guided by students' response to what they have read. You may hear talk about events and characters in the book, the author's craft, or personal experiences related to the story. Literature circles provide a way for students to engage in critical thinking and reflection as they read, discuss, and respond to books. Collaboration is at the heart of this approach. Students reshape and add onto their understanding as they construct meaning with other readers. Finally, literature circles guide students to deeper understanding of what they read through structured discussion and extended written and artistic response. Each member of the group is assigned a specific "role" or focus during the reading. They each take the time to share their role and elicit discussion and sharing of opinion from their group members.
    Some possible Literature Circle Roles are:
    Discussion Director
    Vocabulary Enricher
    Visualizer
    Literary Luminary
    Checker
    Why Use Literature Circles:
    Literature Circles are a great tool because they are:
    Student-centered
    Reader-response centered
    Structured to support students' independence, responsibility and ownership
    Guided primarily by students' insights and questions
    Intended to provide a context where students can APPLY authentic reading and writing skills
    Flexible and fluid and are never the same thing twice
    Structured to support ALL readers
    Collaborative-learning based, the team members rely on each other and everyone must do their part.
    Steps to Using a Literature Circle:

    (view changes)
    4:28 pm
  9. page During Reading- Pick a card, any card- khargett edited http://www.mandygregory.com/How%20To%20Reading%20Strategies.htm#Pick%20A%20Card,%20Any%20Card …

    http://www.mandygregory.com/How%20To%20Reading%20Strategies.htm#Pick%20A%20Card,%20Any%20Card
    Pick A

    Pick a
    Card, Any Card
    I have these green cards that our
    Card- During Reading Specialist made for me. They areStrategy
    Description:
    Pick a card, any card is a during reading strategy that provides
    thinking prompts for a story. I have students while they read the story. You will need to create a deck of cards with the prompts below, one per card (You can add, take away or change the prompts as you so choose). Have each student draw one or two and then we pile them allof the cards before they begin reading. Pile the rest of the cards in the center of the table. I give students each one or two post it notes and tell them I want them toGive Each student will respond to any one or two cardstheir prompt on thea sticky afternote whilte they finish reading. The weread. They the share in pairs,either with mea partner, in a group or theas a whole group. Hereclass.
    Here
    is the
    I never thought that.....
    I thought....
    ...
    I really can't understand...
    I like the way...
    Here are some other prompts I was given:
    Is this character similar to any others) I have read about?
    Can I write a summary of this part of the story?
    ...
    Does this information give me any clues as to what may happen later in the story?
    Why would his information be important for me to know?
    Why Use Pick a Card, Any Card:
    This is a great strategy to scaffold struggling readers. It provides them with a prompt and sets a purpose for the student as they read. Students will also enjoy the game-like element of choosing a card and responding, which will keep them engaged. It is also a great tool to encourage discussion and the sharing of opinions between students.
    Steps to Using Pick A Card, Any Card:
    1. Create a deck of cards using the prompts above. (One prompt per card)
    2. Choose a content-rich narrative to pair with this activity.
    3. Have students pick 1-2 of the cards from the deck.
    4. Give each student 1-2 post-it notes, where they will write their responses to the prompts.
    5. Explain to students that while they read, they will need to focus on the prompts they have selected and respond to them on the index cards.
    6. Once they have read and responded pair students up, put them in a group or hold a whole-class discussion to share their responses to their prompts.
    How I Would Use Pick A Card, Any Card:
    I would use this strategy while having students read a chapter from When I was Puerto Rican by Esmeralda Santiago. I would assign a chapter to be read. I would then put students in groups of four. Each group would be given a small pile of the think-prompt cards to choose from. They will read independently and respond to their individual think prompts. When everyone in the group has finished, they will do a round robin where they share their prompts and responses and all the other members of the group to give their own opinions to prompts that were not theres.
    Works Cited:
    Gregory, Mandy. The How To Reading Strategies.
    http://www.mandygregory.com/How%20To%20Reading%20Strategies.htm#Pick%20A%20Card,%20Any%20Card

    (view changes)
    4:12 pm

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